Monthly Archives: April 2018

Possible Water Taxi for SLU to Renton coming in 2020

As the region’s transportation woes worsen, some are dreaming of bringing back a version of the “Mosquito Fleet,” boats that ferried goods and people around Lake Union, Lake Washington, and Puget Sound between the 1880’s and 1930’s. (They got their name because they were so numerous.)

A step in that direction was a recent test run of a ferry between SLU and Renton sponsored by SECO Develop Inc. King 5 News covered the Wednesday promotional event as did Crosscut’s Mossback. As Mossback writes, “While Microsoft has its own private bus system for employees, SECO envisions a service that serves the broader public and gets autos off the road. ‘We want to connect our energizing hubs,’ says SECO’s Rocale Timmons, director of planning and development. ‘We need to find a way to catalyze innovative transportation solutions.’”

One passenger on the test run summed up the proposed new water taxi this way, “This is very smooth, it’s very fast, and it’s very convenient. This is the kind of innovation that’s really going to set Seattle apart in how it affects mobility.”

 

Stage Struck: Films featuring Lake Union

Not everyone gets to live on a movie set. Here, living around Lake Union we do, both literally and metaphorically.

In the literal sense, going up on the top deck of the building where I live in Eastlake, I can gaze down on the lake where Heath Ledger and Julia Stiles paddled a water cycle in 10 Things I Hate About You, the 1999 adaptation of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew, many years before playing the Joker in The Dark Knight killed Ledger. The movie also shot at Gasworks Park, as did Singles. Of course, there’s the Sleepless in Seattle houseboat on the other side of the lake and slightly to the south of where I stand. On the lake’s south end among the classic vessels docked at the Museum of History and Industry, you can still board the tug on which the 1933 Tugboat Annie was filmed, the Arthur Foss, the oldest tug in existence in the U.S. Tugboat Annie opens on Lake Union.

Looking over to the Aurora Bridge, I think of John Wayne living on a boat and having a shootout on the docks just west of the bridge in McQ, the 1974 piece of Seattle film noir in which Wayne played Detective Lon McHugh, the Dirty Harry of Seattle. It was his first cop role, one of his only two, and the fourth to last movie of his career. (The climaxing chase scene is idiosyncratically Northwest, on the beach out near Moclips.) Circling over to Wallingford on the slope rising above the lake, around 42nd and on Burke Avenue N., there’s the house in which John Lithgow and his family entertained a sasquatch in 1987’s Harry and the Hendersons.

Panning to the southwest, that magnificent flying saucer on stilts and surroundings have been the scene of more than one filming. Alan Pakula’s 1974 political conspiracy thriller, The Parallax View starring Warren Beatty, begins with the assassination of a politician at an event atop the Space Needle. And no one can forget Elvis dining there in the 1963 It Happened At the World’s Fair. There’s even a full Elvis album by the same name. I’m sure there’s a few other movies shot around the lake I’m missing.

Moviemakers are attracted to the lake and its surroundings precisely because of the dramatic and unique scenery – nearly a square mile of water surrounded on three sides by hills. (The fourth side, the south end, was a valley until the Denny Regrade, in which Denny Hill was sluiced down by up to 20 million gallons of water a day from the lake between 1907-11 to open up land for development.) Add to that the houseboat communities surrounding the lake, the unique setting of Gasworks Park, the Olympics off to the west, the skyscrapers of downtown to the south and southwest, and of course, the iconic Needle. Along with Pioneer Square and Pike Place Market, the lake is one of the city’s absolutely quintessential places, often aptly described as the heart of Seattle. The lake is outright the stage set for annual events that draw from the metro region including the Christmas ships and July 4 fireworks.

The world has many beautiful and scenic neighborhoods, but from my admittedly biased perspective, I think the Lake Union ranks in the global top percentiles of truly extraordinary urban vistas. At least a 95, and I would argue, a 98. Just walking down the hill, where I catch sight of the lake, is a stirring experience. Riding the 70 bus downtown, I’m always caught by the panorama of the lake that opens on Fairview in front of Zymo Genetics. On my walks by the lake on Fairview, I stop at the street end parks to take in the stunning views. The lake has many moods, whether the joyful sunniness of summer’s bright lit waters, the zen cool of a slate gray winter day, or its whitecapped boisterousness when a strong wind is blowing in. It’s a primal experience of nature in the midst of the city.

And one of constant motion and change. Some days, often in the gray months, the lake is quiet. Other days it is a cavalcade of marine craft of all sorts, from kayaks and paddle boards to motor boats, cabin cruisers, and sailboat regattas circling the lake. There are the ducks and other tour boats. Working boats from tugs pushing barges to Alaska fishing trawlers. Vintage and replica craft such as the restored Virginia V, last of the old mosquito boat fleet that served the Puget Sound before the ferries and one of the last two steamships operating on the continent, and the Lady Washington, coming in for the Center for Wooden Boats annual festival.

Maneuvering between them all, and flying above, of course, are the seaplanes. The lake has a long history with seaplanes. Bill Boeing personally flew the first Boeing aircraft, a seaplane, from the Boeing hangar dock at Roanoke and Fairview in 1916. Today the lake is one of the continent’s busiest seaplane airports, with 97 flights per day recorded in one recent year. If someone wanted to start this as a new operation, there would be all kinds of NIMBY opposition. But somehow, the sight and sound of seaplanes roaring overhead has become a comforting and familiar signature of the place. So much so that neighbors suggested seaplane images as decorations on freeway walls installed over recent years. (Suggestion not taken by WSDOT, which used more standard designs.)

Lake Union is a place that inspires and stirs, a joining of earth and water under the continually changing skies of Seattle, a vista to fire the imagination. Those of us fortunate enough to be able to live here are graced with a unique setting of great beauty, and a never-ending show. For making movies, the lake is a stage set extraordinaire, whether of the Hollywood variety, or the daily theater that is life.

Below other posters of movies mentioned in this piece. Did we miss any? Let us know – editors@lakeunionwatershed.com