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Bee’s Knees: It’s Pollinator Week!

The Eastlake Community Council is hosting an I-5 Colonnade Open Space clean-up event this Wednesday, June 20, from 9 to noon, and it is a good way to celebrate National Pollinator Week, which is June 18-24 this year. Another good way is to plant native plants. “Research suggests native plants are four time more attractive to native bees than exotic flowers,” says the Xerces Society, and they have a handy list of NW natives that do just that – attract bees.

If you’d like to go further but are not quite ready to become an apiarist, you can create bee habitat. It requires food (those native plants), fresh water source, and nesting places. The Green Queen has the how to’s in her blog post Make your garden bee-friendly.

Begun eleven years ago by a unanimous vote of the U.S. Senate, National Pollinator Week has “grown into an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles,” according to the Pollinator Partnership, the organization announcing the week.

Seattle was officially recognized as the eighth bee city in the country in 2015 by Bee City USA. There are now 70 bee cities, and they provide annual reports. “These reports are bursting with inspiring stories,” says Bee City USA, “of communities planting pesticide-free habitat rich in diversity of locally native plants, discussing their community’s pest management policies with pollinators in mind, and hosting events for young and old to create awe for and greater understanding of the plant-pollinator collaboration that makes our planet bloom and fruit.”

Seattle has a few nationally recognized events happening, too, organized by the nonprofit The Common Acre:

Pollinator Field Day, June 18 @ Beacon Hill Food Forest

Save the Pollinators Symposium, June 19 @ Rainier Arts Center

Meet the Bees, June 21 @ Centro de la Raza

Help Build Pollinator Habitat, June 24 @ Duwamish River Valley

Pollinator Poster 2018 available at pollinator.org/pollinator-week.

Have a comment, suggestion, or other news tip? We’d loved to hear from you.  Email us at editors@lakeunionwatershed.com

Featured sketch by Karen Berry

Historic Schooner Zodiac sails Lake Union and is docked at SLU Park, June 7-12

That beautiful sailboat you may catch sight of on Lake Union is the historic Schooner Zodiac visiting from its homeport in Bellingham.

The Zodiac is available for dockside tours at South Lake Union Park from 2 to 6 p.m. through June 12 and for a few daytime sails.

According to the Zodiac’s website:

Schooner Zodiac was built for the Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical heirs in 1924 for use as a private yacht. Zodiac was designed by William H. Hand, Jr., to epitomize the best features of the American fishing schooner. The Johnsons sailed it up and down the East Coast and participated in the King’s Cup Race across the Atlantic to Spain in 1928.

The Zodiac changed hands several times during the great depression before being purchased by the San Francisco Bar Pilots. Renamed California, she enjoyed a storied career in San Francisco Bay before retiring in 1972 as the last American pilot schooner. She was purchased and restored by a community of shipwrights, sailors and historians who formed the Schooner Zodiac Corporation and operate her as a charter vessel from her homeport in Bellingham, WA. The Zodiac was added to the National Register of Historic Places by act of Congress in 1982.

(The Schooner Zodiac is often confused [even by notable historic ship aficionados] for the Adventuress, a 1913 luxury yacht, originally built for an Arctic expedition and now owned by the non-profit Sound Experience.)

Photos above and below show Schooner Zodiac en route to Lake Washington.

And docked at South Lake Union:

What did the woman in the tower write?

Well over a year ago Elissa Washuta was awarded a plum writing assignment by the city of Seattle. She became a writer-in-residence for the Fremont Bridge and moved her office into one of the draw bridge’s four towers, the one with a neon Rapunzel gazing out a north-facing window.

Washuta’s assignment was open ended – write something while there to commemorate the bridge’s centennial in 2017. So what did she write? She read the piece “Centerless Universe” at the downtown Seattle Public Library in February 2017 (included as pdf below). Another piece also related to her time on the Fremont Bridge was published in the on-line literary journal The Offing. Washuta had a growing literary reputation here in Seattle after graduating from the U.W. MFA program and writing two books. Her reputation is sure to grow, but unfortunately she no longer lives here. Like so many people these days, she was priced out. Sadly Seattle loses a creative talent, as Paul Constant, publisher of The Seattle Review of Books said of her writing, “No matter how prepared you think you are for Washuta, she’s sure to knock you over.”

Her works from the Fremont Bridge do just that.

bridge reading HANDOUT final edit (1)

The buoys are coming to Lake Union

After some controversy, the buoys are finally coming to Lake Union. Five temporary buoys (down from eight) will be installed just before Memorial Day and removed after Labor Day. As Kristen M. Clark of Crosscut reports today:

“[T]he city of Seattle will install in Lake Union a straight line of five buoys equipped with flashing warning lights that will alert boaters, kayakers and other watercraft of seaplanes’ impending takeoffs and landings, the Seattle Office of Planning & Community Development (OCPD) told Crosscut.

“It’ll be a de facto airstrip in the lake — but not in the traditional sense with a cordoned-off physical lane exclusive only to aircraft. Boaters and other lake users will still be able to access the waters around the buoys; the idea is now they’ll have forewarning not to be in the area at the wrong time. (Aviators who will make use of the warning buoys are referring to it as a “seaplane advisory area,” while a government permit application formally called it a “takeoff/landing area.”)

“Such a water runway has been several years in the making with the goal of improving safety on Lake Union for the increasingly congested mix of sailboats, powerboats, yachts, planes, kayakers and paddle-boarders, among others.

“’This warning system is intended to support public safety on the water but does not change any current regulations about right of way for boaters or airplanes,’ OCPD spokesman Jason Kelly said in a statement.”

The buoys are arriving just in time for expanded seaplane service on the lake. Last Thursday Kenmore Air and Harbour Air launched their synergistic flights between Vancouver B.C. and Seattle. GeekWire explains, “Affectionately dubbed the ‘nerd bird,’ it’s hoped the route will attract tech workers and researchers shuttling to offices and institutions in both cities.”

The new route was hailed by Governor Jay Inslee and other dignitaries in attendance Thursday. And while it’s certainly the quickest way to get across the border, not to mention the most beautiful and spectacular, it’s not the cheapest ($570 round trip) or greenest way as commenters on the GeekWire article point out.

But seaplanes have a cherished history on Lake Union “…beginning with the famous Boeing name,” notes Crosscut. “One hundred and two years ago this June, Bill Boeing took to the skies in his first flight using a seaplane that taxied into takeoff from Seattle’s Lake Union.”

Like Boeing over a hundred years ago, both the temporary buoys and the new seaplane service are testing the Lake Union waters.

 

 

 

Possible Water Taxi for SLU to Renton coming in 2020

As the region’s transportation woes worsen, some are dreaming of bringing back a version of the “Mosquito Fleet,” boats that ferried goods and people around Lake Union, Lake Washington, and Puget Sound between the 1880’s and 1930’s. (They got their name because they were so numerous.)

A step in that direction was a recent test run of a ferry between SLU and Renton sponsored by SECO Develop Inc. King 5 News covered the Wednesday promotional event as did Crosscut’s Mossback. As Mossback writes, “While Microsoft has its own private bus system for employees, SECO envisions a service that serves the broader public and gets autos off the road. ‘We want to connect our energizing hubs,’ says SECO’s Rocale Timmons, director of planning and development. ‘We need to find a way to catalyze innovative transportation solutions.’”

One passenger on the test run summed up the proposed new water taxi this way, “This is very smooth, it’s very fast, and it’s very convenient. This is the kind of innovation that’s really going to set Seattle apart in how it affects mobility.”

 

A little marine biology that caught our eye

Eastlaker Craig MacGowan’s name popped up at the top of Danny Westneat’s Sunday Seattle Times column about a Garfield High School marine biology field trip forced to go rogue due to some bureaucratic red tape. MacGowan, a celebrated science teacher, long retired, also occasionally gives popular science talks about Lake Union for Eastlake Community Council public meetings. Maybe there should be one in the future on this latest adventure.

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Dick Wagner, 1933-2017:  Champion of Lake Union

Eastlake and Lake Union lost a dear friend and great champion with the April 20 death of Dick Wagner.  The Seattle Times obituary by Claudia Rowe tells how it all started:  Wagner grew up in New Jersey and was trained as an architect.  “But during the mid-1950s, en route to a summer job in San Francisco, he stopped in Seattle.  That sudden change of plans would alter the trajectory of his life and affect thousands of others.  He fell in love with the city, found a floating home to live in on the shores of Lake Union and eventually married one of his neighbors, the former Colleen Luebke.”

Dick and Colleen came to the lake when wooden boats were no longer dominant, and as the skills and commitment to build, maintain, and operate them were waning.  With genius and unstoppable verve, they threw themselves into preservation and promotion, founding the Center for Wooden Boats as a living museum where people of all levels of skill or income level could experience another era’s legacy aboard handmade wooden craft.   As Caren Crandell, first assistant director at the Center recalls in a tribute on its web site, “The goal was always to get a tool, an oar, a tiller, or a mainsheet in someone’s hand, so they could feel the wood, the water, or the wind as they discovered with amazement what they could do.”

Although Wagner was not an Eastlake resident (the family’s houseboat, the Old Boathouse, is in the shadow of the Aurora Bridge), he was important to Eastlake’s survival as a human-scaled neighborhood.  In the 1960s for the Floating Homes Association, Dick did drawings for parks at Eastlake’s shoreline street-ends—many of which became reality in the ensuing decades (a few still remain to be accomplished).   He also did drawings for traffic calming and greening of Fairview Avenue East, the earliest step toward the City’s 1998 designation of part of Fairview as a “neighborhood green street,” and the street design concept plan that the City is now reviewing.

Dick Wagner was a popular speaker at Eastlake Community Council meetings, as with a 2012 talk on “Mysteries of Lake Union,” based in part on his 2008 book, Legends of the Lake.  As ECC wrote in endorsement of grant funding for the Center for Wooden Boats, “No organization is better suited…to uncover Lake Union’s history and tell [its] story.  We regard CWB as the best organization of its kind anywhere.  The construction, restoration, and operation of a wooden boat require great care and an ability to tell its story.  In just that way, everything else that the Center for Wooden Boats does is equally well-planned, professionally produced, historically grounded, and effective at reaching a broader audience.”

ECC offers condolences to Dick Wagner’s wife, sister, two sons and grandchild. At his request, no public service was held.  But surely he would have been pleased that on May 21 a flotilla of historic wooden boats including the Virginia V, M/V Lotus, Tordenskjold, and hundreds of other smaller vessels sailed in tribute, between the Center for Wooden Boats and the Wagners’ Old Boathouse.

Donations in memory to Dick Wagner may be made to The Center for Wooden Boats (1010 Valley St, Seattle, WA, 98109), online at cwb.org, or by phone at 206-382-2628.  Please include “Dick Wagner Memorial” in the memo or notes line.  ECC has made such a donation and encourages others to do so.

 

Article written by Chris Leman, reprinted with permission from the Eastlake News

CWB copy

sketch by Karen Berry

Robin’s Nest will be built at old Red Robin site

Last month the Daily Journal of Commerce reported that development of the old Red Robin site was moving forward with a 61-union residential structure containing space for a restaurant or pub on the ground level and 21 underground parking spaces. The new construction will play homage to the old site calling itself Robin’s Nest — quite a nest it will be too with rooftop decks all around. However, neighboring residents are appealing some of the projects design — one being that street access have a sidewalk and enough room for vehicle turn-around and garbage collection.

DJC article pdf

photo: b9 Architecture

Second Notice: New York Times highlights Eastlake real estate

The New York Times seems to have discovered Eastlake. For the second time in less than a month another Eastlake property, this time an Italian hillside villa condo, part of the Siena Del Lago complex, with shared greenhouse lap pool and views of Lake Union, was featured in the Times’ real estate section last Sunday under the column “What You Get.” The asking price? Around $1,150,000. Just a few weeks ago it was “What You Get — $950,000” and a Lake Union floating home.

And the status of the Eastlake condo? Don’t even think about it. Like the floating home, it had a pending sale within a week of the Times’ spread.

Also like the floating home it was photographed by Eastlake resident, New York Times photographer, Ruth Fremson. She travels all around the Northwest for work but in the last month has gotten a couple of serendipitous local assignments she could walk to.

Siena Del Lago

Siena Del Lago condominums

 

Another Woman Locked in a Tower (sort of)

Crosscut, news of the Great Nearby, reports that the Fremont Bridge’s Rapunzel now has company. Hidden away in the northwest control tower with the long-haired beauty is Seattle writer-in-residence Elissa Washuta. In order to escape this admittedly chosen fate, she must write her way out and produce a work that represents or illuminates “some aspect of the bridge and the bridge’s history be it real or metaphorical.” It’s all part of the bridge’s centennial coming in 2017.

Elissa was selected from around 200 applicants to tackle this mission. She is contemplating something that deals with Seattle’s indigenous people, maybe her own personal history (she is of Native American heritage) and/or the barriers and portals that bridges and waterways represent, reports Crosscut.